Category : Korean Language Infographics

Winter Vocabulary in Korean

Winter Vocabulary in Korean

Winter Vocabulary in Korean

Although it’s technically still fall, we just had our first snow here in the Seoul area a few days ago. The temperature has been bouncing back and forth between below freezing for a few days, and then back up to mildly warm. I have a weird feeling that this will be a warmer winter compared to past winters here as it’s usual still not this warm here.

With that said, I thought it would be a perfect time to get some winter vocabulary to you guys. We might make a part 2 for this one around Christmas. These should be helpful for those of you heading into the winter season!

Vocabulary in this infographic:

겨울 (gyeo-ul) = Winter

눈 (nun) = Snow

눈사람 (nun-sa-ram) = Snowman

코트 (ko-teu) = Coat

목도리 (mok-do-ri) = Scarf

장갑 (jang-gab) = Gloves

춥다 (chup-da) = Cold

눈송이 (nun-song-i) = Snowflake

핫초코 (hat-cho-ko) = Hot chocolate

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How to Say Banana in Korean

How to Say Banana in Korean

How to Say Banana in Korean

Whatsup everyone! Dom here again. Today, we’re introducing some Konglish to you guys with the word banana in Korean. This is probably the easiest fruit to remember in Korean as it sounds almost exactly like its English counterpart.

바나나 (ba-na-na)

In Korean, it sounds more like “bah-nah-nah”.

For a bunch, you would use the Korean counter (송이) like so:

바나나 한 송이 주세요 (ba-na-na han song-i ju-se-yo) = Give me one bunch of bananas please.

Here are some other vocabulary words related to the word, banana:

바나나 우유 (ba-na-na u-yu) = banana milk

바나나 껍질 = (ba-na-na ggeop-jil) = banana peel

바나나 빵 (ba-na-na bbang) = banana bread

You can also check out our detailed infographic on fruits here.

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How to Say Friend in Korean

How to Say Friend in Korean

How to Say Friend in Korean

If you want to make some friends to help you with your Korean, this word is of course, very important. The word friend can be used in many situations here, but one thing I was confused about when I first arrived, is that you can’t use it for everyone, even if you would be considered friends back in your home country.

In Korea, there is a very strict hierarchy system which is very evident in the language. For instance, very rarely will you call someone, even family members or coworkers by their name. Everyone has titles. The same goes for friend. Let’s explain further:

친구 (chin-gu)

This is the word that directly translates into ‘friend’ in English. However, you can only use this terms for people you are close to who are the same age as you (born in the same year). Anyone born in the same year can be considered your friend.

형/언니 (hyeong/eon-ni)

These words refer to someone older than you who you are very close to. Basically a friend, but because of the hierarchy, you would use a formal term to refer to them. 형 is used by younger men to refer to a male friend older than them. 언니 is used by younger women to refer to a female friend older than them. In a family sense, these are also used to refer to brother and sister in the same manner.

오빠/누나 (o-ppa/nu-na)

These also refer to someone older. 오빠 is used by younger women to refer to an older man they consider a friend (also used by women as a way to call their boyfriends/husbands). 누나 is used by younger men to refer to an older woman they consider a friend.

Other words that contain 친구:

여자친구/여친 (yeo-ja-chin-gu/yeo-chin) = Girlfriend

남자친구/남친 (nam-ja-chin-gu/nam-chiin) = Boyfriend

As you can see, it can be a little confusing at first. Most learners are used to using just one word for friend. But it quickly gets easier and you will remember them quickly if you can consistently studying Korean. it basically becomes second nature.

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Autumn Vocabulary in Korean

Autumn Vocabulary in Korean

The fall weather is finally in full swing here in Korea after a toasty summer. It hasn’t gotten too cold yet, but the nights are getting quite chilly. Fall and spring are probably the best seasons in Korea. Summer is always too hot and humid, and winter is bone chilling cold. It doesn’t even snow here that much so no snow days!

Hiking at this time of the year is popular among Koreans as well. I like to take a few trips to some local mountains. Always a good time. If you are thinking about visiting Korea, I would recommend this time the best.

Here is a review of the vocabulary in this infographic:

가을 (ga-eul) = Fall/Autumn

잎 (ip) = Leaf/Leaves (same spelling for both singular and plural)

할로윈 (hal-lo-win) = Halloween

단풍 (dan-pung) = Fall foliage

스웨터 (seu-we-teo) = Sweater

호박 (ho-bak) = Pumpkin

쌀쌀한 날 (ssal-ssal-han nal) =  Chilly Day

달 (dal) = Moon

갈퀴 (gal-kwi) = Rake

 

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How to Say Baby in Korean

How to Say Baby in Korean

How to Say Baby in Korean

Hey everyone, Dom here. Hope everyone had a great weekend! We visited Hyo’s sister over the weekend and had a blast. Her sister is actually a little over a month pregnant so we’re gonna be an aunt and uncle pretty soon. Pretty exciting! We thought it would be a good post to talk about saying baby in Korean.

Like many other word in Korean, there are several words for one thing that you use depending on the context and meaning. Talking to other people learning Korean, this has been one of the most confusing words as you will hear all versions many times.

So which one do you use? Let’s start with the first one.

아가 (a-ga)

This version of baby is used kind of poetically and is cute of a cute version of baby (like a grandma telling her grandchild to hush in a sweet quiet voice). For example: “아가야, 울지 마” (Baby, don’t cry). Although many people use this word, it is not the official word for baby since it’s usually used in a calling manner. People also use this for calling out to their daughter in law as a way to show closeness.

아기 (a-gi)

This is the formal/official word that you can use for baby. It can also refer to baby animals.

애기 (ae-gi)

This is a cute/informal way for saying the word 아기. It can also be used as a nickname for sweetheart between lovers.

베이비 (be-i-bi)

This is the Konglish version of the English word baby.

If you’re looking to call someone you’re romantically involved with “baby”, you would use the word 자기/자기야 (ja-gi/ja-gi-ya).

It can be pretty easy to get these words confused. The best way it to practice and then it becomes natural (although you may still make some mistakes)

Here are some other vocabulary words related to babies and parenting:

자장가 부르다 = to sing a lullaby

코하자 = It’s bedtime

응가 = Poopie

쉬 = Pee/tinkle

*Remember to only use romanization for a short time. It’s always better to learn the alphabet for better pronunciation!*

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How to Say Car in Korean

How to Say Car in Korean

It’s Wednesday! Been a long week so we are happy to get to the weekend. Hope everyone is having a good week.

Today, we have a common, but simple word for everyone.

The word for car is technically 자동차, however, most people just simply use 차 unless they are being really technical (차 is also the word for tea as well!)

Driving a car in Korea is pretty much the same as back home, except I feel that the laws here are not enforced as much. As you know, Korea has a 빨리 빨리 (fast fast) culture and this includes driving. It still takes some getting used to even after driving here for 3 years.

It’s been essential for me to learn vocabulary related to Korean since you have to be able to understand warning signs, traffic notices, etc.

Parking is also another big issue. Lots of cars, and no space. The word for parking lot is 주차장 (ju-cha-jang).

As we said above, the Korean for car is 차. Luckily, you can easily remember some other transportation/vehicle related words because they also have the word 차 in them.

Here are some other related vocabulary words:

승용차 (seung-yong-cha) = Passenger vehicle

승합차 (seung-hap-cha) = Multi passenger vehicle

이륜차 (il-ryun-cha) = Two wheeled vehicle (Like a motorcycle or scooter)

화물차 (hwa-mul-cha) = Open back truck (like a pickup truck)

For drivers:

우측통행 (u-cheuk-tong-haeng) = Right lane

좌측통행 (jwa-cheuk-tong-haeng) = Left lane

휴계소 (hyu-gye-so) = Rest stop

주유소 (ju-yu-so) = Gas stop

정류장 (jeong-ryu-jang) = Bus stop

횡당보도 (hoeng-dang-bo-do) = Crosswalk

진입금지 (jin-ip-geum-ji) = Do not enter

유턴금지 (yu-teon-geum-ji) = No u-turns

양보 (yang-bo) = Yield

주차금지 (ju-cha-geum-ji) – No parking zone

Remember to only use romanization for a short time. Even though we include them here, it can only go so far when it comes to pronunciation.

See you guys next time!

 

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