Category : Korean Language Infographics

How to Say Congratulations in Korean

How to Say Congratulations in Korean

If you have Korean friends or acquaintances or if you are/will be spending a decent amount of time in Korea, this will be a handy phrase to know.

You will eventually want to congratulate someone on a graduation, a birthday, wedding, etc. Notice that there are four ways to say congratulations.

*side note: don’t use Google Translate for this as it will turn out something completely different and you will sound weird*

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How to Say I Miss You in Korean

How to Say I Miss You in Korean

This is one of the most common phrases you will use and come across, especially if you are dating a Korean significant other. If you watch a lot of Korean dramas or listen to a lot of Korean songs, you will hear this A LOT.

My wife and I still use this a lot ;p

Since missing someone implies closeness, the most common form you will be using is 보고 싶어 which is the casual/informal form. This form drops the “요”. The phrase is a combination of the verb 보다 (to see) and the grammatical form to want (~고 싶다). We will be starting a grammar series soon so we will go more in depth about this form at some point in the future.

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How to Say Water in Korean

How to Say Water in Korean

The word for water in Korean is very easy to learn and kind of sounds like an extending cow sound (moo) in English with an l sound added on at the end.

This should be one of the first words you learn and you should know how to ask for water as well. A lot of other words use “물” such as “콧물” for mucus. It literally means nose water. Same thing for tears which is “눈물” which literally means eye water.

We’ve also included other words related to water in the infographic above:

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How to Say Cheers in Korean

How to Say Cheers in Korean

Chances are if you come to Korea for work or travel (and are 18+ ㅋㅋ), you will be invited to go out and drink with your coworkers or friends. When you go out with your coworkers, it is called a “회식” and you eat, talk, and drink with each other.

Now if you don’t drink, don’t be afraid to refrain from drinking and just tell them the reason why. Aside from the older generation, most people will have no problem.

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How to Say Grandma in Korean

How to Say Grandma in Korean

So last week, we did a post on how to say grandfather in Korean. So naturally, we had to do one on grandmother as well! Saying grandma follows the same standard as grandpa as there are slightly different ways to say it depending on if it’s your mother or father’s side and if you want to say it in a formal or informal way.

Keep in mind that for both grandma and grandpa, a standard 할머니/할아버지 can be used for both sides of the family. Adding the “외” is more academically correct in terms of studying.

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How to Say Grandpa in Korean

How to Say Grandfather in Korean

Korean family vocabulary can be a bit difficult to learn for learners of Korean. Even Koreans don’t know all the proper terms for family members. The reason being is that unlike in English where “grandpa” or “grandma” can be used for both sides of the family, that’s not the case for Korean. This applies to all family titles.

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