Category : Korean Language Infographics

How to Say Happy New Year in Korean

How to Say Happy New Year in Korean

How to Say Happy New Year in Korean

Hey everyone! Hope everyone had an awesome Christmas holiday with your family and friends. We had a pretty good holiday here. Being the introverted couple we are, we decided to chill at home, cook, watch movies, and drink some eggnog (made it myself and turned out great). I’m on vacation for a month, but sadly Hyo still has to work. However, with so much time off, expect more posts from now until late January as I will have more energy to do more work.

For today, we are getting ready for the new year by teaching you how to say Happy New Year in Korean.

In the graphic, you will see the polite version:

새해 복 많이 받으세요 (sae-hae bok man-i ba-deu-se-yo)

You can use this with pretty much anyone you meet. Friends, family, coworkers, etc. Saying this will not come across as rude in most situations.

Formal: 새해 복 많이 받으십시오 (sae-hae bok man-i ba-deu-ship-shi-o)

The formal version of happy new year would be used in formal settings and you will find these on formal greeting like cards, emails in the office, or on a billboard on the street. You will probably not use this one, but it’s still good to know and recognize it when you see it.

Informal: 새해 복 많이 받아 (sae-hae bok man-i bad-a)

You would use this towards kids or very close friends and family. However, it’s still very rare to use this and the polite version is still the best one to use.

Keep in mind that Koreans celebrate two new years. One for the changing of the Gregorian calendar year, and one for the lunar new year. You can use these greetings for both.

Now here is some useful vocabulary related to the new year for you to use!:

자정 = midnight

년 = year

건배 = cheers, toast

색종이 조각 = Confetti

불꽃놀이 = Fireworks

겨울 = Winter

파티 = Party

샴페인 = Champagne

새해 첫날 = New Year’s Day

새해 = New Year

And that’s it! What are your plans for the new year? Singing and dancing? Staying at home? Regardless of what you plan, we hope you have a happy one and enjoy it!

 

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How to Say Dad in Korean

How to Say Dad in Korean

How to Say Dad in Korean

Hey everyone. Dom here again ready to bring you another “How to Say in Korean” post.

We’ve done some other posts related to family vocabulary and phrases so you will want to check those out as well (more to come):

Brother in Korean

Grandma in Korean

Grandpa in Korean

Family Vocabulary Chart

For today’s word, we’re talking about how to say dad/father in Korean. There are three main ways to say dad in the Korean language.

Let’s start with the first one:

아버지 (a-beo-ji)

This is the most common form you will see and use. You would call your own father by this name. However, you would never use this word for someone else’s father.

아버님 (a-beo-nim)

This is the formal version of the word father. You would address your own father by this terms in formal situations (like a special birthday dinner or wedding). You would also use this to refer to someone else’s father or for your father in law. I call Hyo’s father by this name all the time.

아빠 (a-ppa)

This is the informal/casual form of the word father and most children use this for this father in all situations except very formal ones. Like the word 아버지, you would only use this for your own father and not someone else’s.

Another thing to remember is when you want to say something like “My father.”, you wouldn’t use something like “내 아버지”.

The most common way of saying my father would be to say “우리 아버지”. Korean like to use 우리 not only for “we”, but “my” or “our” as well even when referring to one person. It is also acceptable to use the formal “저희” to refer to my as well:

저희 아버지가 선생님입니다 (jeo-hee a-beo-ji-ga seon-saeng-nim-im-ni-da) = My father is a teacher.

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Winter Vocabulary in Korean

Winter Vocabulary in Korean

Winter Vocabulary in Korean

Although it’s technically still fall, we just had our first snow here in the Seoul area a few days ago. The temperature has been bouncing back and forth between below freezing for a few days, and then back up to mildly warm. I have a weird feeling that this will be a warmer winter compared to past winters here as it’s usual still not this warm here.

With that said, I thought it would be a perfect time to get some winter vocabulary to you guys. We might make a part 2 for this one around Christmas. These should be helpful for those of you heading into the winter season!

Vocabulary in this infographic:

겨울 (gyeo-ul) = Winter

눈 (nun) = Snow

눈사람 (nun-sa-ram) = Snowman

코트 (ko-teu) = Coat

목도리 (mok-do-ri) = Scarf

장갑 (jang-gab) = Gloves

춥다 (chup-da) = Cold

눈송이 (nun-song-i) = Snowflake

핫초코 (hat-cho-ko) = Hot chocolate

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How to Say Banana in Korean

How to Say Banana in Korean

How to Say Banana in Korean

Whatsup everyone! Dom here again. Today, we’re introducing some Konglish to you guys with the word banana in Korean. This is probably the easiest fruit to remember in Korean as it sounds almost exactly like its English counterpart.

바나나 (ba-na-na)

In Korean, it sounds more like “bah-nah-nah”.

For a bunch, you would use the Korean counter (송이) like so:

바나나 한 송이 주세요 (ba-na-na han song-i ju-se-yo) = Give me one bunch of bananas please.

Here are some other vocabulary words related to the word, banana:

바나나 우유 (ba-na-na u-yu) = banana milk

바나나 껍질 = (ba-na-na ggeop-jil) = banana peel

바나나 빵 (ba-na-na bbang) = banana bread

You can also check out our detailed infographic on fruits here.

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How to Say Friend in Korean

How to Say Friend in Korean

How to Say Friend in Korean

If you want to make some friends to help you with your Korean, this word is of course, very important. The word friend can be used in many situations here, but one thing I was confused about when I first arrived, is that you can’t use it for everyone, even if you would be considered friends back in your home country.

In Korea, there is a very strict hierarchy system which is very evident in the language. For instance, very rarely will you call someone, even family members or coworkers by their name. Everyone has titles. The same goes for friend. Let’s explain further:

친구 (chin-gu)

This is the word that directly translates into ‘friend’ in English. However, you can only use this terms for people you are close to who are the same age as you (born in the same year). Anyone born in the same year can be considered your friend.

형/언니 (hyeong/eon-ni)

These words refer to someone older than you who you are very close to. Basically a friend, but because of the hierarchy, you would use a formal term to refer to them. 형 is used by younger men to refer to a male friend older than them. 언니 is used by younger women to refer to a female friend older than them. In a family sense, these are also used to refer to brother and sister in the same manner.

오빠/누나 (o-ppa/nu-na)

These also refer to someone older. 오빠 is used by younger women to refer to an older man they consider a friend (also used by women as a way to call their boyfriends/husbands). 누나 is used by younger men to refer to an older woman they consider a friend.

Other words that contain 친구:

여자친구/여친 (yeo-ja-chin-gu/yeo-chin) = Girlfriend

남자친구/남친 (nam-ja-chin-gu/nam-chiin) = Boyfriend

As you can see, it can be a little confusing at first. Most learners are used to using just one word for friend. But it quickly gets easier and you will remember them quickly if you can consistently studying Korean. it basically becomes second nature.

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Autumn Vocabulary in Korean

Autumn Vocabulary in Korean

The fall weather is finally in full swing here in Korea after a toasty summer. It hasn’t gotten too cold yet, but the nights are getting quite chilly. Fall and spring are probably the best seasons in Korea. Summer is always too hot and humid, and winter is bone chilling cold. It doesn’t even snow here that much so no snow days!

Hiking at this time of the year is popular among Koreans as well. I like to take a few trips to some local mountains. Always a good time. If you are thinking about visiting Korea, I would recommend this time the best.

Here is a review of the vocabulary in this infographic:

가을 (ga-eul) = Fall/Autumn

잎 (ip) = Leaf/Leaves (same spelling for both singular and plural)

할로윈 (hal-lo-win) = Halloween

단풍 (dan-pung) = Fall foliage

스웨터 (seu-we-teo) = Sweater

호박 (ho-bak) = Pumpkin

쌀쌀한 날 (ssal-ssal-han nal) =  Chilly Day

달 (dal) = Moon

갈퀴 (gal-kwi) = Rake

 

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