Category Korea

How to Say Good Luck in Korean

How to Say Good Luck in Korean

These are the common and casual ways of what roughly translates to good luck in Korean. You have probably heard “화이팅” (also sometime 파이팅/fighting) on dramas or just around your Korean friends. The other two are also very common and used among close people and friends.

잘 하고 와 is especially used when you want to tell someone good luck on a test or an exam.

You can add “요” if talking to someone older than you and you’re not quite at the point where banmal is accepted.

You can add things like oppa (오빠), sister (누나, 언니), or hyung (형) depending on who you are addressing if you are really close to them. They are not necessary but people add them sometimes. So for example:

형 잘 하고 와! (hyung jal ha-go wa)

오빠 잘 해! (o-ppa jal hae)

누나 화이팅! (nu-na hwa-i-ting)

(See our post on titles for people for more)

Also we added some things that are considered lucky in Korea. I have no idea where the pig thing or the baby tooth thing came from and neither does Hyo. I guess every place has its weird good luck charms and superstitions.

Hope this helps! And for more materials to supplement your Korean vocab, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

Phrases in this graphic:

화이팅! [hwa-i-ting] = You can do it (fighting!)

잘 해(요)! [jal-hae-(yo)] = Do well!

잘 하고 와(요)! [jal ha-go wa-(yo)] = Do well and return!

 

Days of the Week in Korean

Days of the Week in Korean

Here we introduce you to how to say days of the week in Korean. All of them end in “요일” (kind of like “day” in English) and can be shortened to just the first syllable (common on calendars and good for quickly sharing information).

If you study these for even just an hour, you should be able to memorize them easily and once you do that, it’s just a matter of daily use and applying it to your everyday life.

The words are also derived from Chinese characters:

日 = 일 (il)  Which means sun/day

月 = 월 (wol) Which means moon

火 = 화 (hwa) Which means fire

水 = 수 (su) Which means water

木 = 목 (mok) Which means wood/tree

金 = 금 (geum) Which means gold

土 = 토 (to) Which means earth

List of vocabulary in this graphic:

일요일 (il-yo-il) = Sunday

월요일 (weol-yo-il) = Monday

화요일 (hwa-yo-il) = Tuesday

수요일 (su-yo-il) = Wednesday

목요일 (mok-yo-il) = Thursday

금요일 (geum-yo-il) = Friday

토요일 (to-yo-il) = Saturday

If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

Common South Korean Last Names that are also Vocabulary Words

Common South Korean Last Names that are also Vocabulary Words

Korean has a lot of family names that are also easy to remember vocabulary words. This is pretty common for many other last names as well. If you don’t know it, Koreans basically have 3 syllables in their name with the family name appearing first (rarely you may meet someone with 4 syllables…I’ve met one in my entire time in Korea).

This can make them easier to remember than Western names (once you get more familiar with Hnagul).

In this graphic, we’ve told you the basic Korean meanings, but most names also have another meaning which link to the hanja version of the name.

There are many Korean last names with the most common being Kim (김), Park (박), and Lee (이) .

Here are nine of some of the most common ones you will come across.

If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

List of Korean family words in this graphic:

초 (cho) = Seconds

배 (bae) = Pear

백 (baek) = 100

감 (gam) = Persimmon

금 (geum) = Gold

김 (gim) = Laver

문 (mun) = Door

서 (seo) = West

차 (cha) = Tea

 

How to say Years in Korean (Time Words)

How to say Years in Korean (Time Words)

These are all very basic words for years that you will come across often. Notice that the word for year changes depending on the situation.

When counting years using “년”, sino numbers are used. When using “해”, native numbers are used. 년 is most commonly used after years, for example to say 2017, we would add “년” to the end. so it becomes 2017년.

When counting age, it changes again, but we will cover that in a later graphic 🙂

You can find more about periods of time with our cheat sheets over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

Here are the vocabulary words in this infographic:

해/년  (hae/nyeon) = Year

작년 (jak-nyeon) = Last year

재작년 (jae-jak-nyeon) = Year before last

올해/금년 (ol-hae/geum-nyeon) = This year

내년/다음해 (nae-nyeon/da-eum-hae) = Next year

내후년 (nae-hu-nyeon) = In two years

연간 (yeon-gan) = Yearly

연초 (yeon-cho) = Beginning of the year

연말 (yeon-mal) = End of the year

새해 (seo-hae) = New year

그해 (geu-hae) = That year

매년/해마다 (mae-nyeon/hae-ma-da) =Every year

Korean Words to Use at the Coffee Shop

Korean Words to Use at the Coffee Shop

Here are some useful Korean words for when you are at the coffee shop. Notice that most of the vocabulary are just Konglish versions of their name in English so the only thing you have to worry about is getting that Korean sound to it when you speak it (which can be very awkward at first). If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

Here are the list of words in text form from this graphic:

아메리카노 (a-me-ri-ka-no) = Americano

라떼 (la-dde) = Latte

카푸치노 (ka-pu-chi-no) = Cappuccino

에스프레소 (e-seu-peu-le-so) = Espresso

카페 모카 (ka-pe mo-ka) = Cafe Mocha

마끼아또 (ma-kki-a-ddo) = Macchiato

녹차 (nok-cha) = Green Tea

핫초코 (hat-cho-ko) = Hot Chocolate

뜨거운 (ddeu-geo-un) = Hot

따뜻한 (dda-ddeut-han) = Warm

차가운 (cha-ga-un) = Cold

Korean Words for Beverages

Korean Words for Beverages

For today’s vocabulary, we’re just introducing some basic drinks that are easy to learn. You might need to know these when ordering something. If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

Vocabulary:

물 (mul) = Water

주스 (ju-seu) = Juice

우유 (u-yu) = Milk

콜라 (kol-la) = Cola/Coke

맥주 (maek-ju) = Beer

커피 (keo-pi) = Coffee

차 (cha) = Tea

핫초코 (hat-cho-ko) = Hot Chocolate

와인 (wa-in) = Wine

Korean Medical Vocabulary Part 2

Korean Medical Vocabulary Part 2

Here is part 2 of our sicknesses & illnesses vocabulary. You may need to use some of these if you’re ever in the hospital in Korea. If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

Korean vocabulary words used in this graphic:

고혈압 (go-hyeol-ab) = High blood pressure

저혈압 (jeo-hyeol-ab) = Low blood pressure

뇌진탕 (nweh-jin-tang) = Concussion

당뇨병 (dang-nyo-byeong) = Diabetes

수술 (su-sul) = Surgery

무좀 (mu-jom) = Athlete’s Foot

설사 (seol-sa) = Diarrhea

귀통 (gwi-tong) = Earache

질환 (jil-hwan) = Disease

생리통 (saeng-ri-tong) = Menstrual Cramps

궤양 (gweh-yang) = Ulcer

재채기 (jae-chae-gi) = Sneeze

 

Korean Medical Vocabulary (Symptoms & Illnesses)

Korean Medical Vocabulary (Symptoms & Illnesses)

This will be part one of a series on sicknesses, symptoms, and medical words in Korean. Knowing these can be very helpful if you need to go to the hospital in Korea. These are also just good to know in general.

If you are ever in the hospital, here are some common Korean phrases you can use to describe the symptoms you have.

For example…

I have a headache (two ways):

머리가 아파요 (meo-ri-ga a-pa-yo)/ 두통이 있어요 (du-teong-i i-sseo-yo)

I have a sore throat:

목이 아파요 (mok-i a-pa-yo)

I have a stomachache:

배가 아파요 (bae-ga a-pa-yo)

I have a cold:

감기 걸렸어요 (gam-gi-eh geol-lyeoss-eo-yo)

I have the flu:

독감 걸렸어요 (dok-gam geol-lyeo-sseo-yo)

I have a fever:

열이 있어요. (yeol-i i-sseo-yo)

I have a stuffy nose:

코가막혔어요. (ko-gha mak-hyeoss-eo-yo)

I have a runny nose:

자꾸 콧물이 나요 (ja-ggu kon-mul-ee na-yo)

If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

Korean vocabulary in this graphic:

감기 (gam-gi) = A cold

독감 (dok-gam) = Flu

두통 (du-tong) = Headache

치통 (chi-tong) = Toothache

복통 (bok-tong) = Stomachache

구토 (gu-to) = Vomiting

변비 (byeon-bi) = Constipation

열 (yeol) = Fever

고열 (go-yeol) = High fever

기침 (gi-chim) = Cough

콧물 (kot-mul) = Runny nose

암 (am) = Cancer

 

 

Hangul Alphabet Pronunciation Chart (Consonants)

Hangul Alphabet Pronunciation Chart (Consonants)

 

Here is a Hangul Alphabet Chart that will help you learn the pronunciation of the consonants.

Many people learning Korean know how to pronounce vowels of the Hangul alphabet because they sound just like they are written. However, knowing how to pronounce the consonants is less well known. Hopefully this helps you all out with some of the basics. We’ve also written them below with the English romanization.

If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

ㄱ = 기역 (gi-yeok)

ㄲ = 쌍기역 (ssang-giyeok)

ㄴ = 니은 (ni-eun)

ㄷ = 디귿 (di-geut)

ㄸ = 쌍디귿 (ssang-di-geut)

ㄹ = 리을 (ri-eul)

ㅁ = 미음 (mi-eum)

ㅂ = 비읍 (bi-eub)

ㅃ = 쌍비읍 (ssang-bi-eub)

ㅅ = 시옷 (si-ot)

ㅆ = 쌍시옷 (ssang-si-ot)

ㅇ = 이응 (i-eung)

ㅈ = 지읒 (ji-eut)

ㅉ = 쌍찌읒 (ssang-jji-eut)

ㅊ = 치읓 (chi-eut)

ㅋ = 키읔 (ki-euk)

ㅌ = 티읕 (ti-eut)

ㅍ = 피읖 (pi-eup)

ㅎ = 히읗 (hi-eut)