Category : Korea

Korean Instant Noodles Chart

Korean Instant Noodles Chart - The Best

Korean Instant Noodles Chart

This chart features some of the more popular brands of instant noodles from 1963 and onward. We wanted to include many, many, more, but there are literally hundreds, if not thousands of brands from over the years.

It was actually quite fun researching and hand drawing the many different designs of the packaging. Hyo loves instant noodles, and now I finally can recognize her favorite brands a bit easier.

If you would like a more detailed a closer view of the chart, you can find it at our store here.

read more

How to Say Girlfriend in Korean

How to say girlfriend in Korean

How to say girlfriend in Korean

Hey everyone! Today, we’re gonna teach you how to say girlfriend in Korean and some related vocabulary.

Learning this word is very easy. For example, take 여자친구  which is the standard word for girlfriend.

Like the English word, if we break it down, we get:

여자 ( yeo-ja) = girl/woman

친구 (chin-gu) = friend

Put them together, and you get girlfriend! If you want to shorten it (slang), you would simply use the first syllables of each word:

여친 (yeo-chin)

This would be the equivalent of “gf” in English.

And that’s pretty much it. However, you wouldn’t use this word for a girl who is simply a friend. You would use 여성 친구 which is basically “female friend”.

Here are some sentences/questions you can use:

여자친구 있어요? (yeo-ja-chin-gu i-sseo-yo) = Do you have a girlfriend?

내 여자친구가 되어줄래? (nae yeo-ja-chin-gu-ga doe-eo-jul-lae) Will you be my girlfriend?

네 여자친구가 되고 싶어. (ne yeo-ja-chin-gu-ga doe-go ship-eo) I want to be your girlfriend.

And for more romance related words like pet names/nicknames, check out our other post on this subject!

read more

How to Say Happy New Year in Korean

How to Say Happy New Year in Korean

How to Say Happy New Year in Korean

Hey everyone! Hope everyone had an awesome Christmas holiday with your family and friends. We had a pretty good holiday here. Being the introverted couple we are, we decided to chill at home, cook, watch movies, and drink some eggnog (made it myself and turned out great). I’m on vacation for a month, but sadly Hyo still has to work. However, with so much time off, expect more posts from now until late January as I will have more energy to do more work.

For today, we are getting ready for the new year by teaching you how to say Happy New Year in Korean.

In the graphic, you will see the polite version:

새해 복 많이 받으세요 (sae-hae bok man-i ba-deu-se-yo)

You can use this with pretty much anyone you meet. Friends, family, coworkers, etc. Saying this will not come across as rude in most situations.

Formal: 새해 복 많이 받으십시오 (sae-hae bok man-i ba-deu-ship-shi-o)

The formal version of happy new year would be used in formal settings and you will find these on formal greeting like cards, emails in the office, or on a billboard on the street. You will probably not use this one, but it’s still good to know and recognize it when you see it.

Informal: 새해 복 많이 받아 (sae-hae bok man-i bad-a)

You would use this towards kids or very close friends and family. However, it’s still very rare to use this and the polite version is still the best one to use.

Keep in mind that Koreans celebrate two new years. One for the changing of the Gregorian calendar year, and one for the lunar new year. You can use these greetings for both.

Now here is some useful vocabulary related to the new year for you to use!:

자정 = midnight

년 = year

건배 = cheers, toast

색종이 조각 = Confetti

불꽃놀이 = Fireworks

겨울 = Winter

파티 = Party

샴페인 = Champagne

새해 첫날 = New Year’s Day

새해 = New Year

And that’s it! What are your plans for the new year? Singing and dancing? Staying at home? Regardless of what you plan, we hope you have a happy one and enjoy it!

 

read more

How to Say Dad in Korean

How to Say Dad in Korean

How to Say Dad in Korean

Hey everyone. Dom here again ready to bring you another “How to Say in Korean” post.

We’ve done some other posts related to family vocabulary and phrases so you will want to check those out as well (more to come):

Brother in Korean

Grandma in Korean

Grandpa in Korean

Family Vocabulary Chart

For today’s word, we’re talking about how to say dad/father in Korean. There are three main ways to say dad in the Korean language.

Let’s start with the first one:

아버지 (a-beo-ji)

This is the most common form you will see and use. You would call your own father by this name. However, you would never use this word for someone else’s father.

아버님 (a-beo-nim)

This is the formal version of the word father. You would address your own father by this terms in formal situations (like a special birthday dinner or wedding). You would also use this to refer to someone else’s father or for your father in law. I call Hyo’s father by this name all the time.

아빠 (a-ppa)

This is the informal/casual form of the word father and most children use this for this father in all situations except very formal ones. Like the word 아버지, you would only use this for your own father and not someone else’s.

Another thing to remember is when you want to say something like “My father.”, you wouldn’t use something like “내 아버지”.

The most common way of saying my father would be to say “우리 아버지”. Korean like to use 우리 not only for “we”, but “my” or “our” as well even when referring to one person. It is also acceptable to use the formal “저희” to refer to my as well:

저희 아버지가 선생님입니다 (jeo-hee a-beo-ji-ga seon-saeng-nim-im-ni-da) = My father is a teacher.

read more

How to Say Love in Korean

How to Say Love in Korean

How to Say Love in Korean

Hey everyone! November is almost over and Christmas is almost upon us. Hope all my American friends had a great Thanksgiving.

Previously, we did a post on how to say “I love you” in Korean language. Check out that one after you’re done with this one (or now). This post is a little different from that one in that we’re talking about the actual word love and its associations.

As you know, love is not only expressed in terms of saying I love you, but in other ways like passions, attachment, etc.

As you can see above, the most common way to refer to love is 사랑 (sa-rang).  You will usually see this word in it’s verb form (사랑하다) but it can be used without the verb stem as well. A popular form of this would be:

내 사랑 (nae sa-rang)

This means my love. It’s very romantic and you’ll hear it in poems, romantic movies, dramas, songs, etc.

연정 (yeon-jeong)

This refers to love in a sense of passion and/or attachment to someone. Think someone who relentlessly pursues someone or treats the person they love as if they are the only person in the world.

애정 (ae-jeong)

This is the more technical definition of the word love and was more popular than 사랑 in the past. You can use this to refer to the general feeling of love.

애착 (ae-chak)

This refers to a strong attachment to someone or even an animal. It’s not usually romantic in nature and like an emotional bond. Think of how an infant or baby has a strong attachment to it’s mother.

And there you have it! As we said earlier, check out How to Say I Love You in Korean for more info on this topic 🙂

read more

Winter Vocabulary in Korean

Winter Vocabulary in Korean

Winter Vocabulary in Korean

Although it’s technically still fall, we just had our first snow here in the Seoul area a few days ago. The temperature has been bouncing back and forth between below freezing for a few days, and then back up to mildly warm. I have a weird feeling that this will be a warmer winter compared to past winters here as it’s usual still not this warm here.

With that said, I thought it would be a perfect time to get some winter vocabulary to you guys. We might make a part 2 for this one around Christmas. These should be helpful for those of you heading into the winter season!

Vocabulary in this infographic:

겨울 (gyeo-ul) = Winter

눈 (nun) = Snow

눈사람 (nun-sa-ram) = Snowman

코트 (ko-teu) = Coat

목도리 (mok-do-ri) = Scarf

장갑 (jang-gab) = Gloves

춥다 (chup-da) = Cold

눈송이 (nun-song-i) = Snowflake

핫초코 (hat-cho-ko) = Hot chocolate

read more
1 2 3 4 65