Tag Archives: korean slang

How to Say Princess in Korean

How to Say Princess in Korean

How to Say Princess in Korean

Hey everyone! Dom here again bringing you another short and quick vocabulary lesson. We’ve just finished the Chuseok holiday here and we had a great time eating and just getting some rest before heading back to work (5 days off!).

Today’s lesson will be the word princess in Korean. If you’ve watched your fair share of Korean dramas, you will know that there are quite a few historical dramas that focus on important kings, queens, princesses, and princes throughout Korea’s history.

Let’s start with the basic form of the word.

Most people when referring to the general term for princess will simply use 공주 (gong-ju). You will find this in titles of songs, lyrics, tv shows, etc.

However, “님” is added if you are referring to a princess in formal terms. This is more respectful and is akin to saying “Her Highness” instead of simply princess. In this situation, you are not just speaking to the person, but speaking of them, thus showing more respect.

Of course in today’s world, it’s rare that you would use the term princess seriously. Nowadays it’s used simply to refer to old stories or to mock a girl/woman who is very spoiled.

For example, someone might reply “네, 공주님” to someone who is requesting something of someone and being very demanding. Some lovers may also use it jokingly.

Another way someone might use it is to say someone has 공주병 (gong-ju-byeong) if they are very spoiled. It basically takes the word princess and adds “병” which is a word for disease. Basically there are saying you have a princess disease.

On the flip side, the word for prince is 왕자 (wang-ja)

read more

How to Say Good Game in Korean

How to Say Good Game in Korean

How to Say Good Game in Korean

Raise your hand if you’re a gamer! If you’ve played with Koreans on their servers or just in general on other games, you may be confused or wondering what some of their game talk may mean.

Korean is a lot like English in this sense. We have a lot of words for good game, bye bye, see ya, etc.

So let’s start off with good game.

In English, ‘good game’ is abbreviated with ‘gg’. When you sound it out, it sounds like gee gee. Well in Korean, the sound is basically the same.

When you see ㅈㅈ for good game, it’s a shortened form of  ‘지지’ which is basically the Korean sound for the letter g two times in a row. It was probably made popular once online gaming got popular in Korea, and they just adapted already known terms in English, and made them into shortened Korean forms.

read more

How to Say Thank You in Korean

How to Say Thank You in Korean

How to Say Thank You in Korean

When I first started using Korean, I had watched a few dramas and I was always confused which thank you I should use. I heard the formal version most often, but also heard the impolite form.

It wasn’t until I studied Korean more that I found out about politeness levels and then it made sense of course.

For saying thank you, there are several ways like most basic phrases in Korean. You have the formal, polite, and informal forms to work with.

Let’s start with the formal version. There are two ways (romanization included):

read more

How to Say Kiss in Korean

How to Say Kiss in Korean

How to Say Kiss in Korean

Big fan of Korean dramas and movies? Kpop? You’ve likely seen a lot of kissing scenes with all the shows that revolve around romance.

If you are a big fan of these, then you probably already know the words for kiss in Korean. For those of you that don’t, we are gonna teach you the two main words for kiss, and some phrases that are related to these words.

read more

How to Say Cute in Korean

How to Say Cute in Korean

How to Say Cute in Korean

This is a word that you will come across often in real life and in dramas/kpop. Who doesn’t wanna say “cute!” when they see a baby, dog, or other furry little animal. For some reason, cute in Korean sounds cuter (not trying to make a joke) than its English counterpart. Maybe it’s the way Koreans say it as they have a tendency to really like cute things or make things as cute as possible.

Let’s start with the basics:

귀엽다 (gwi-yeop-da)

This is the basic dictionary form of cute. It literally means to be cute and you can often just say this as it is in most situations. However unless you’re pretty sure of how to use it, you will need to conjugate it.

Let’s take a look at the different forms you can use.

Formal Version: 귀엽슴니다 (gwi-yeop-seum-ni-da)

This is the formal version of saying cute. It’s not very likely that you will use cute in a formal situation though. For instance I highly doubt you would call your boss or teacher cute to their face. It really sounds kind of awkward even if you’re not using it towards someone older or higher in position than you.

Standard Version: 귀여워요 (gwi-yeo-weo-yo)

This is the standard version that you will want to use around people who you are not close to or people older than you. Notice the 요 ending.

Casual Version: 귀여워 (gwi-yeo-weo)

This is the one that you will probably hear most often and it is used around your close friends, family, and people younger than you.

Remember when in doubt, just use the standard version to be safe.

At the bottom of our infographic, you will see another word – 귀요미 (gwi-yo-mi)

This is a Korean slang word used to describe someone who is cute or acts cute. You could use this to describe a baby, child, pet, significant other etc. It’s a very versatile slang word.

Some people also use this to describe someone who uses a lot of aegyo (cute actions or noises). Hyo likes to use this for me when she jokes around.

Corny Joke for cute in Korean:

What do you call a cute person with no ears? 귀 없다!

귀 = ears

없다 = verb that means to be without

귀 없다 = to be without ears

read more

Best Books to Learn Korean: Our Best 7

Ready to take your Korean studies to The next level?

Whether you’re a beginner, or intermediate and higher looking to up your game, we’ve compiled the perfect list of textbooks for learning the Korean language.

Our list consists of books that are very simple, yet thorough in how they teach you Korean. Sometimes it’s hard finding that perfect textbook that doesn’t bore you to death or seem so hard that you just want to give up.

Although I still have some work to do to become fluent (help me out Hyo!), I’ve used several of the books below to help get me from no nothing beginner to where I’m able to hold most conversations now. Some of the others are books that many of my friends have used. I’ve asked their opinions and compiled some of them into reviews.

read more
1 2 3