Tag Archives: korean culture

How to Say Friend in Korean

How to Say Friend in Korean

How to Say Friend in Korean

If you want to make some friends to help you with your Korean, this word is of course, very important. The word friend can be used in many situations here, but one thing I was confused about when I first arrived, is that you can’t use it for everyone, even if you would be considered friends back in your home country.

In Korea, there is a very strict hierarchy system which is very evident in the language. For instance, very rarely will you call someone, even family members or coworkers by their name. Everyone has titles. The same goes for friend. Let’s explain further:

친구 (chin-gu)

This is the word that directly translates into ‘friend’ in English. However, you can only use this terms for people you are close to who are the same age as you (born in the same year). Anyone born in the same year can be considered your friend.

형/언니 (hyeong/eon-ni)

These words refer to someone older than you who you are very close to. Basically a friend, but because of the hierarchy, you would use a formal term to refer to them. 형 is used by younger men to refer to a male friend older than them. 언니 is used by younger women to refer to a female friend older than them. In a family sense, these are also used to refer to brother and sister in the same manner.

오빠/누나 (o-ppa/nu-na)

These also refer to someone older. 오빠 is used by younger women to refer to an older man they consider a friend (also used by women as a way to call their boyfriends/husbands). 누나 is used by younger men to refer to an older woman they consider a friend.

Other words that contain 친구:

여자친구/여친 (yeo-ja-chin-gu/yeo-chin) = Girlfriend

남자친구/남친 (nam-ja-chin-gu/nam-chiin) = Boyfriend

As you can see, it can be a little confusing at first. Most learners are used to using just one word for friend. But it quickly gets easier and you will remember them quickly if you can consistently studying Korean. it basically becomes second nature.

read more

How to Say Baby in Korean

How to Say Baby in Korean

How to Say Baby in Korean

Hey everyone, Dom here. Hope everyone had a great weekend! We visited Hyo’s sister over the weekend and had a blast. Her sister is actually a little over a month pregnant so we’re gonna be an aunt and uncle pretty soon. Pretty exciting! We thought it would be a good post to talk about saying baby in Korean.

Like many other word in Korean, there are several words for one thing that you use depending on the context and meaning. Talking to other people learning Korean, this has been one of the most confusing words as you will hear all versions many times.

So which one do you use? Let’s start with the first one.

아가 (a-ga)

This version of baby is used kind of poetically and is cute of a cute version of baby (like a grandma telling her grandchild to hush in a sweet quiet voice). For example: “아가야, 울지 마” (Baby, don’t cry). Although many people use this word, it is not the official word for baby since it’s usually used in a calling manner. People also use this for calling out to their daughter in law as a way to show closeness.

아기 (a-gi)

This is the formal/official word that you can use for baby. It can also refer to baby animals.

애기 (ae-gi)

This is a cute/informal way for saying the word 아기. It can also be used as a nickname for sweetheart between lovers.

베이비 (be-i-bi)

This is the Konglish version of the English word baby.

If you’re looking to call someone you’re romantically involved with “baby”, you would use the word 자기/자기야 (ja-gi/ja-gi-ya).

It can be pretty easy to get these words confused. The best way it to practice and then it becomes natural (although you may still make some mistakes)

Here are some other vocabulary words related to babies and parenting:

자장가 부르다 = to sing a lullaby

코하자 = It’s bedtime

응가 = Poopie

쉬 = Pee/tinkle

*Remember to only use romanization for a short time. It’s always better to learn the alphabet for better pronunciation!*

read more

How to Say Rain in Korean

How to Say Rain in Korean

How to Say Rain in Korean

Hello again everyone! Enjoying the fall weather? We thought we would do a few posts related to the weather now that it’s finally getting cooler here. It was a long, hot summer and I’m happy to have it finally cool down. However…winter is coming.

Today, we are talking about the word for rain in Korean. Many of you might already know it since there is a famous actor/singer in Korean who goes by the name 비.

It’s a really simple and easy word to learn and you should have no trouble remembering it.

Now how do Koreans use this word in daily conversation? Lets’ start off with a few examples:

지금 비 와요. (ji-geum bi wa-yo) It’s raining now.

You will hear this often and you can raise your intonation and pose it as a question as well:

지금 비 와요? (ji-geum bi wa-yo) Is it raining now?

Some other ways to use rain in a sentence:

오늘 비가 오겠어요 (o-neul bi-ga o-ge-sseo) It seems like it will rain today.

비 오는 날 싫어요 (bi o-neun nal shil-eo-yo) I hate rainy days.

Remember to drop the 요 if you want to use the formal version.

Here are some other vocabulary words as well:

우산

장마

구름

호우

홍수

If you want to learn other Korean vocabulary words for the weather, check out our other post on it.

read more

How to Say Princess in Korean

How to Say Princess in Korean

How to Say Princess in Korean

Hey everyone! Dom here again bringing you another short and quick vocabulary lesson. We’ve just finished the Chuseok holiday here and we had a great time eating and just getting some rest before heading back to work (5 days off!).

Today’s lesson will be the word princess in Korean. If you’ve watched your fair share of Korean dramas, you will know that there are quite a few historical dramas that focus on important kings, queens, princesses, and princes throughout Korea’s history.

Let’s start with the basic form of the word.

Most people when referring to the general term for princess will simply use 공주 (gong-ju). You will find this in titles of songs, lyrics, tv shows, etc.

However, “님” is added if you are referring to a princess in formal terms. This is more respectful and is akin to saying “Her Highness” instead of simply princess. In this situation, you are not just speaking to the person, but speaking of them, thus showing more respect.

Of course in today’s world, it’s rare that you would use the term princess seriously. Nowadays it’s used simply to refer to old stories or to mock a girl/woman who is very spoiled.

For example, someone might reply “네, 공주님” to someone who is requesting something of someone and being very demanding. Some lovers may also use it jokingly.

Another way someone might use it is to say someone has 공주병 (gong-ju-byeong) if they are very spoiled. It basically takes the word princess and adds “병” which is a word for disease. Basically there are saying you have a princess disease.

On the flip side, the word for prince is 왕자 (wang-ja)

read more

How to Say Good Game in Korean

How to Say Good Game in Korean

How to Say Good Game in Korean

Raise your hand if you’re a gamer! If you’ve played with Koreans on their servers or just in general on other games, you may be confused or wondering what some of their game talk may mean.

Korean is a lot like English in this sense. We have a lot of words for good game, bye bye, see ya, etc.

So let’s start off with good game.

In English, ‘good game’ is abbreviated with ‘gg’. When you sound it out, it sounds like gee gee. Well in Korean, the sound is basically the same.

When you see ㅈㅈ for good game, it’s a shortened form of  ‘지지’ which is basically the Korean sound for the letter g two times in a row. It was probably made popular once online gaming got popular in Korea, and they just adapted already known terms in English, and made them into shortened Korean forms.

read more

How to Say Thank You in Korean

How to Say Thank You in Korean

How to Say Thank You in Korean

When I first started using Korean, I had watched a few dramas and I was always confused which thank you I should use. I heard the formal version most often, but also heard the impolite form.

It wasn’t until I studied Korean more that I found out about politeness levels and then it made sense of course.

For saying thank you, there are several ways like most basic phrases in Korean. You have the formal, polite, and informal forms to work with.

Let’s start with the formal version. There are two ways (romanization included):

read more
1 2 3 14