Tag Archives: culture

Counting to Ten in Korean

Counting to ten in Korean

Counting to ten in Korean

Hey everyone. Sorry for the long break from posting again. The new job has changed my schedule quite a bit and it’s taking some getting used to. Haven’t quite had the energy I used to have but I’m going to try to get back to consistent posting for you guys.

Numbers! An important element of any language. You may want to communicate age, how much you want of something, and of course, amounts of money.

For starters, you should know about the two number systems that Korean uses. Native numbers and Sino numbers.

What’s the difference? For native Korean numbers, you will want to use them for saying your age or for counting things. For Sino numbers, you will use them for pretty much everything else like money, dates, addresses, phone numbers, and generally numbers above 100 (although there are a few exceptions here and there)

Since this post is for basic 1-10, check out our more thorough infographic on numbers if you want more information.

Learning the basic 1-10 numbers for each system may seem fairly easy at first, but if you are trying to use Korean frequently, you will definitely forget and get confused between which system to use in a given situation. I still confuse the two from time to time.

The good thing is that most of the time, Koreans will still know what you’re talking about and may even correct you which helps your learning process.

Native Korean for things:

When you count things, the pronunciation for some numbers change. So for example:

If  you wanted to say you have one thing, you wouldn’t say 하나 개. It would change to 한 개 (han-gae)

Two things – 두개 (changes from 둘) [du gae]

Three things – 세 개 (changes from 셋) [se gae]

Four things – 네 개 (changes from 넷) [ne gae]

Five things – 다섯 개 [da-seot gae]

Six things – 여섯 개 [yeo-seot gae]

Seven things – 일곱 개 [il-gob gae]

Eight things – 여덟 개 [yeo-deol gae]

Nine things – 아홉 개 [a-hop gae]

Ten things – 열 개 [yeol gae]

It applies to age as well.

For Sino numbers, you would keep the pronunciation the same in most cases. Some exceptions would be months.

For example, the month of June:

육월 No

유월 Yes (yu-weol)

Or the month of October:

십월 No

시월 Yes (shi-weol)

Find out more about months in Korean here.

And it’s that simple! Here are the Sino numbers once more:

일 (il) = One

이 (i) = Two

삼 (sam) = Three

사 (sa) = Four

오 (o) = Five

육 (yuk) = Six

칠 (chil) = Seven

팔 (pal) = Eight

구 (gu) = Nine

십 (ship) = Ten

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How to Say Sun in Korean

How to Say Sun in Korean

How to Say Sun in Korean

There are two ways to say sun in Korean.

The first way is the most common and simple way:

해 (hae)

Hey! That’s what it sounds like. You will hear this version in daily conversation so if you want to refer to the sun, use this word. It is also the pure Korean version of the word sun.

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How to Say Tiger in Korean

How to say tiger in Korean

How to say tiger in Korean

The word for tiger in Korean is very similar to the word for cat, 고양이 (go-yang-i).

The animal itself has a lot of cultural importance and history in the country. If you watched the Olympics in Pyeongchang this, year, you saw that the mascot was a white tiger.

White tiger in Korean = 백호 (baek-ho)

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How to Say Beer in Korean

How to Say Beer in Korean

How to Say Beer in Korean

A lot of people love beer. It’s no different in Korea. Although soju is the number one alcohol in Korea, people love their beer here. Beer in the Korean language is simply 맥주 (maek-ju).

When I first arrived in Korea in 2009, the only brands of beer you could find here were the major Korean brands like Cass and Hite (which are terrible IMO). Craft beers were unheard of, and the only foreign beers you could find would be be at pubs and bars and they were expensive.

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Basic Korean Verbs You Should Know (Pt.2)

Basic Korean Verbs Pt. 2

Basic Korean Verbs Pt. 2

Vocabulary in this graphic:

사다 (sa-da) = To buy

여행하다 (yeo-haeng-ha-da) = To travel

묻다 (moot-da) = To ask

포기하다 (po-gi-ha-da) = To give up

마시다 (ma-si-da) = To drink

울다 (ul-da) = To cry

생각하다 (saeng-gak-ha-da) = To think

공부하다 (gong-bu-ha-da) = To study

춤추다 (chum-chu-da) = To dance

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The Ultimate Korean Gift List: Best Gifts for Your Yourself, Friends and Family

Korean gifts

Korean gifts

I’ve been living in Korea for a little over 7 years now and I often get asked by friends and family to bring them back Korean gifts when I visit home during the vacations. My mom loves the green tea and although I’m not really into Kpop or dramas hardcore, some of my friends are and I’ll bring them back a poster or trinket of some sort. I also have several friends who love the variety of snacks and instant noodles.

However, some of you may not have friends or family in Korea or you may not be going anytime soon, so I’ve made a list of some of my favorite things that you can find online or at your local Korean mart to satisfy that need.

Most of these can be found on Amazon and some on other great sites. So without further ado, let’s get started!

THIS POST MAY CONTAIN AFFILIATE LINKS. PLEASE READ MY DISCLOSURE FOR MORE INFO.

Food

Korean Clothing/Wall Art/Stationery

  • Korean flag themed hats Amazon
  • Posters from the Dom & Hyo Store
  • Hangul Periodic Table Poster Amazon
  • Keyboard stickers for Hangul Amazon
  • This cool weekly and monthly planner Amazon
  • Kakao Friends gift set Amazon
  • Kakao friends slipper (Ryan) Amazon
  • Kakao Friends Ryan big stuffed doll Amazon
  • The Korean Flag to hang on a wall or outside Amazon

Traditional/Cultural/Cooking

Kdrama/Kpop

Learning Korean

Beauty/Cosmetics

So as you can see, there is lots of variety to cater to all tastes. If you find something unique that you don’t see here, just shoot us an email and we will add it asap.

 

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