Tag Archives: culture

How to Say Love in Korean

How to Say Love in Korean

How to Say Love in Korean

Hey everyone! November is almost over and Christmas is almost upon us. Hope all my American friends had a great Thanksgiving.

Previously, we did a post on how to say “I love you” in Korean language. Check out that one after you’re done with this one (or now). This post is a little different from that one in that we’re talking about the actual word love and its associations.

As you know, love is not only expressed in terms of saying I love you, but in other ways like passions, attachment, etc.

As you can see above, the most common way to refer to love is 사랑 (sa-rang).  You will usually see this word in it’s verb form (사랑하다) but it can be used without the verb stem as well. A popular form of this would be:

내 사랑 (nae sa-rang)

This means my love. It’s very romantic and you’ll hear it in poems, romantic movies, dramas, songs, etc.

연정 (yeon-jeong)

This refers to love in a sense of passion and/or attachment to someone. Think someone who relentlessly pursues someone or treats the person they love as if they are the only person in the world.

애정 (ae-jeong)

This is the more technical definition of the word love and was more popular than 사랑 in the past. You can use this to refer to the general feeling of love.

애착 (ae-chak)

This refers to a strong attachment to someone or even an animal. It’s not usually romantic in nature and like an emotional bond. Think of how an infant or baby has a strong attachment to it’s mother.

And there you have it! As we said earlier, check out How to Say I Love You in Korean for more info on this topic 🙂

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Counting to Ten in Korean

Counting to ten in Korean

Counting to ten in Korean

Hey everyone. Sorry for the long break from posting again. The new job has changed my schedule quite a bit and it’s taking some getting used to. Haven’t quite had the energy I used to have but I’m going to try to get back to consistent posting for you guys.

Numbers! An important element of any language. You may want to communicate age, how much you want of something, and of course, amounts of money.

For starters, you should know about the two number systems that Korean uses. Native numbers and Sino numbers.

What’s the difference? For native Korean numbers, you will want to use them for saying your age or for counting things. For Sino numbers, you will use them for pretty much everything else like money, dates, addresses, phone numbers, and generally numbers above 100 (although there are a few exceptions here and there)

Since this post is for basic 1-10, check out our more thorough infographic on numbers if you want more information.

Learning the basic 1-10 numbers for each system may seem fairly easy at first, but if you are trying to use Korean frequently, you will definitely forget and get confused between which system to use in a given situation. I still confuse the two from time to time.

The good thing is that most of the time, Koreans will still know what you’re talking about and may even correct you which helps your learning process.

Native Korean for things:

When you count things, the pronunciation for some numbers change. So for example:

If  you wanted to say you have one thing, you wouldn’t say 하나 개. It would change to 한 개 (han-gae)

Two things – 두개 (changes from 둘) [du gae]

Three things – 세 개 (changes from 셋) [se gae]

Four things – 네 개 (changes from 넷) [ne gae]

Five things – 다섯 개 [da-seot gae]

Six things – 여섯 개 [yeo-seot gae]

Seven things – 일곱 개 [il-gob gae]

Eight things – 여덟 개 [yeo-deol gae]

Nine things – 아홉 개 [a-hop gae]

Ten things – 열 개 [yeol gae]

It applies to age as well.

For Sino numbers, you would keep the pronunciation the same in most cases. Some exceptions would be months.

For example, the month of June:

육월 No

유월 Yes (yu-weol)

Or the month of October:

십월 No

시월 Yes (shi-weol)

Find out more about months in Korean here.

And it’s that simple! Here are the Sino numbers once more:

일 (il) = One

이 (i) = Two

삼 (sam) = Three

사 (sa) = Four

오 (o) = Five

육 (yuk) = Six

칠 (chil) = Seven

팔 (pal) = Eight

구 (gu) = Nine

십 (ship) = Ten

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How to Say Sun in Korean

How to Say Sun in Korean

How to Say Sun in Korean

There are two ways to say sun in Korean.

The first way is the most common and simple way:

해 (hae)

Hey! That’s what it sounds like. You will hear this version in daily conversation so if you want to refer to the sun, use this word. It is also the pure Korean version of the word sun.

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How to Say Tiger in Korean

How to say tiger in Korean

How to say tiger in Korean

The word for tiger in Korean is very similar to the word for cat, 고양이 (go-yang-i).

The animal itself has a lot of cultural importance and history in the country. If you watched the Olympics in Pyeongchang this, year, you saw that the mascot was a white tiger.

White tiger in Korean = 백호 (baek-ho)

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How to Say Beer in Korean

How to Say Beer in Korean

How to Say Beer in Korean

A lot of people love beer. It’s no different in Korea. Although soju is the number one alcohol in Korea, people love their beer here. Beer in the Korean language is simply 맥주 (maek-ju).

When I first arrived in Korea in 2009, the only brands of beer you could find here were the major Korean brands like Cass and Hite (which are terrible IMO). Craft beers were unheard of, and the only foreign beers you could find would be be at pubs and bars and they were expensive.

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Basic Korean Verbs You Should Know (Pt.2)

Basic Korean Verbs Pt. 2

Basic Korean Verbs Pt. 2

Vocabulary in this graphic:

사다 (sa-da) = To buy

여행하다 (yeo-haeng-ha-da) = To travel

묻다 (moot-da) = To ask

포기하다 (po-gi-ha-da) = To give up

마시다 (ma-si-da) = To drink

울다 (ul-da) = To cry

생각하다 (saeng-gak-ha-da) = To think

공부하다 (gong-bu-ha-da) = To study

춤추다 (chum-chu-da) = To dance

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