Author Archives: Dom

Dom & Hyo Survey

Hey guys! Hope everyone is having a great start to the month of June. We’re writing this post today because we are curious about how to help our readers more with learning Korean.

So far, this blog has been mostly focused on infographics with common, but necessary phrases and words for beginners learning Korean. However, we are curious if we can create other posts or products that can help you with learning the language. We’ve honestly been struggling at what else we could add to the blog. The infographics have been great, but it’s also important to diversify and add other things that could help you guys.

That’s where our survey comes in. The survey is very short, containing only six questions. These are questions for us to gauge what you guys are interested in, which will then give us some ideas for future blog posts and ebooks or courses.

And there is a bonus! Just add your email and name, and you will be entered into a contest to get all of our ebooks for free! We will choose three winners at the end of June, and your prize will be sent by email. You do not need to add your name or email address unless you want to be entered into the contest.

And that’s it! We appreciate the help! You can find the survey below.

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Math Vocabulary in Korean

Math Vocabulary in Korean

Math Vocabulary in Korean

Hey whatsup guys! Today we’re talking about how to say math terms in Korean. You may have always been curious about how to say these even though you will most likely not use them often unless you go through some type of schooling in Korea.

Let’s start with the basic math calculations

addition = 더하기 (deo-ha-gi)

subtraction = 빼기 (bbae-gi)

multiplication = 곱하기 (gob-ha-gi)

division = 나누기 (na-nu-gi)

equals = 은/는 (eun/neun)

So how would you say these in a math equation? For starters, always use sino Korean numbers when saying math equations.

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How to Say Angel in Korean

How to Say Angel in Korean

How to Say Angel in Korean

We’re back for a word of the day! Today’s word is angel. Angel in Korean is very simple:

천사 (cheon-sa) = angel

Easy right? Of course, many people use this to describe someone who has or is very nice. Or someone who has helped them out greatly even if it inconvenienced them. So how would you use this word to describe someone like that?

Let’s take a look at some phrases and words:

넌 나의 천사야 (neon na-ui cheon-sa-ya) = You’re my angel

Since you will most likely be using this towards someone close to you, you can use the casual form. If not, you can just change it to the polite form:

(name/title here) 나의 천사예요 (name/title na-ui cheon-sa-ye-yo)

How about “You’re like an angel.”?

도미닉 씨는 천사 같아요 (do-mi-nik cheon-sa ga-ta-yo) = Dominic is like an angel.

You can just change the names for the person you are referring to or you can use 너 if you are really close to the person.

And there you have it! If you have any questions, feel free to leave them in the comments section or email us. See you next time 🙂

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How to Say Coffee in Korean

How to Say Coffee in Korean

How to Say Coffee in Korean

Ah coffee. One of, if not the most popular drinks in the world. It’s interesting that when I first came to Korea in 2009, coffee still wasn’t as big as it is now. Now, you can see coffee shops everywhere. It’s almost to the point where I think there are too many coffee shops around.

So how do you say coffee in Korean? It’s actually really simple and easy to remember.

커피 (keo-pi) = coffee

It’s a Konglish form of the English word coffee so you can see how the Korean word sounds similar. Remember, there’s no sound similar to the f sound in Korean, so lots of times, the consonant ㅍ is used to mimic the f sound.

So what if you went to a coffee shop and wanted to order a cup of joe?

커피 주세요 (keo-pi ju-se-yo) = Please give me some coffee.

커피 한잔 주세요 (keo-pi han-jan ju-se-yo) = Please give me a cup/glass of coffee.

These phrases also apply to other drinks you can order at the coffee shop. Just replace coffee with your drink of choice.

Here are some other related coffee words:

카페 (ka-pe) = cafe

커피 샵 (keo-pi shyap) = coffee shop

커피 콩 (keo-pi kong) = coffee bean

커피 메이커 = (keo-pi me-i-keo) = coffee maker

블랙 커피 (beul-laek keo-pi) = black coffee

바리스타 (ba-ri-seu-ta) = barista

And there you have it! Enjoy your daily cup of coffee.

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How to Say Gold in Korean

How to Say Gold in Korean

How many of you like jewelry? There are many different kinds of jewelry with gold being one of the most popular. So let’s find out how to say gold in Korean!

Unlike English, there is a slight difference when referring the the metal itself and the color. If you’re not familiar with Korean colors, you should know that 색 is usually added on to mark the word as a color. So for gold, the color itself would be 금색. 금 is the word for gold. Really simple right?

So how would you say something like “the gold bag” or “the gold necklace”?

Let’s take a look at some examples below:

금색 가방 (geum-saek ga-bang) = the gold bag

금색 목걸이 (geum-saek mok-geo-li) = the gold necklace

금색 반지 (geum-saek ban-ji) = the gold ring

So you simply add 금색 in front of the noun you want to describe. This pretty much applies to all colors with some exceptions (too long to go into in this post).

*Always remember that learning to read and pronounce hangul is always better than romanization!*

 

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Telling Time in Korean

Telling Time in Korean

Telling Time in Korean

So while trying to think of a new post for the blog, we realized we have never done a post on telling time in Korean. We did do a post on time words here awhile back so this will help with that post as well.

For time in Korean, there are two sets of numbers used. They are the native  Korean numbers and sino Korean numbers. For telling hours, you will want to use the native Korean numbers. For minutes, you will use the sino Korean numbers. So for example, if we wanted to say 1:05, we would say:

한 시 오분 (han si o-bun)

You can see “한” which is the number one in native Korean and then “시” which is used as a time counter for hours. After that you will see “오분”. “오” is the number 5 in sino Korean and “분” is a time counter for minutes.

What about…8:34?

We would say:

열덟 시 삼십사분 (yeol-deol si sam-sip-sa-bun)

Now if you want to say something like it’s two o’clock, then you would add “이예요” or “예요” depending on if the last letter is a vowel or a consonant.

It’s 3 o’clock = 세 시예요 (se si-ye-yo)

It’s 4:45 = 네 시 사십오분이예요 (ne si sa-sip-o-bun-i-ye-yo)

If you want to ask the time:

몇 시예요? (myeot si-ye-yo) = What time is it?

List of vocab in this infographic:

한 시 (han si) = one o’clock

두 시 (du si) = two o’clock

세 시 (se si) = three o’clock

네 시 (ne si) = four o’clock

다섯 시 (da-seot si) = five o’clock

여섯 시 (yeo-seot si) = six o’clock

일곱 시 (il-gob si) = seven o’clock

여덟 시 (yeo-deol si) = eight o’clock

아홉 시 (a-hop si) = nine o’clock

열 시 (yeol si) = ten o’clock

열한 시 (yeol-han si) = eleven o’clock

열두 시 (yeol-du si) = twelve o’clock

십오분 (sip-o-bun) = a quarter past

삼십분/반 (sam-sip-bun/ban) = half past

사십오분 (sa-sip-o-bun) = a quarter to

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