web analytics

Counting to ten in Korean

Hey everyone. Sorry for the long break from posting again. The new job has changed my schedule quite a bit and it’s taking some getting used to. I haven’t quite had the energy I used to have but I’m going to try to get back to consistent posting for you guys.

Numbers! An important element of any language. You may want to communicate age, how much you want of something, and of course, amounts of money.

For starters, you should know about the two number systems that Korean uses. Native numbers and Sino numbers.

What’s the difference? For native Korean numbers, you will want to use them for saying your age or for counting things. For Sino numbers, you will use them for pretty much everything else like money, dates, addresses, phone numbers, and generally numbers above 100 (although there are a few exceptions here and there)

Since this post is for basic 1-10, check out our more thorough infographic on numbers if you want more information.

Learning the basic 1-10 numbers for each system may seem fairly easy at first, but if you are trying to use Korean frequently, you will definitely forget and get confused between which system to use in a given situation. I still confuse the two from time to time.

The good thing is that most of the time, Koreans will still know what you’re talking about and may even correct you which helps your learning process.

Native Korean for things:

When you count things, the pronunciation for some numbers change. So for example:

If you wanted to say you have one thing, you wouldn’t say 하나 개. It would change to 한 개 (han-gae)

Two things – 두개 (changes from 둘) [du gae]

Three things – 세 개 (changes from 셋) [se gae]

Four things – 네 개 (changes from 넷) [ne gae]

Five things – 다섯 개 [da-seot gae]

Six things – 여섯 개 [yeo-seot gae]

Seven things – 일곱 개 [il-gob gae]

Eight things – 여덟 개 [yeo-deol gae]

Nine things – 아홉 개 [a-hop gae]

Ten things – 열 개 [yeol gae]

It applies to age as well.

For Sino numbers, you would keep the pronunciation the same in most cases. Some exceptions would be months.

For example, the month of June:

육월 No

유월 Yes (yu-weol)

Or the month of October:

십월 No

시월 Yes (shi-weol)

Find out more about months in Korean here.

And it’s that simple! Here are the Sino numbers once more:

일 (il) = One

이 (i) = Two

삼 (sam) = Three

사 (sa) = Four

오 (o) = Five

육 (yuk) = Six

칠 (chil) = Seven

팔 (pal) = Eight

구 (gu) = Nine

십 (ship) = Ten

Video:



Learning Korean is Easy when You Have this Starter Pack

Learning the Korean language can seem like a big task at first, but the way you learn can make it a simple and fun experience.

Whether you want to understand basic words in K-pop or K-dramas, impress your Korean friends, or simply learn more about Korean culture, the Korean Language Starter Pack will help you quickly learn and remember the most commonly used Korean words and phrases today.

What’s Inside?

• Infographic Compilation – More than 160 Korean infographics that help you quickly learn common words and phrases.

• Review Flashcards – Easily learn and review 600 must-know Korean words with printable front and back flashcards.

• Cheat Sheets – 17 printable Korean word lists that ensure you always have access to the most commonly used Korean words.

• Weekly Vocabulary Guide – Kickstart your Korean vocabulary with 16 value-packed lessons that you can conveniently complete at your own pace.

*Bonus - Free updates for life!

Receive all future updates by e-mail when they are released, as well as a bonus printable poster from our store! Simply email us with your order number and the name of the poster you would like.

Immediately after purchase, a zip file will be available for instant download. Remember, this is a digital file that will conveniently be sent to you right away (not a physical book).

Happy Learning!