Episode #24: Nicknames and Bad Words

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When learning a language, swearing words are an interesting thing. It’s different because you didn’t grow up with the stigma of the word being bad, so it doesn’t sound “bad” to you. My students demonstrate this daily. They think all English swearing words are just like regular words and really don’t know the impact of what they are saying sometimes. I usually have to correct them and tell them exactly why they can’t just drop f-bombs all over the place if they lose a game in class.

Of the Korean swear words I’ve learned, I’ve learned most of them from hearing my students say them (they think I can’t understand), but occasionally I’ll ask Hyo what a word is, but she won’t tell me at first haha. I just would like to know just in case my students think they can still get away with bad language even in Korean (and just for fun admittedly haha).

With the nicknames, I already made a comic about that, and she has infinite names for me, but I guess i’m just not as creative in this area.

Anyways, until next time! Remember there are 6 days left for the giveaway…check yesterday’s post 🙂


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  • Michael Hwang

    Thanks for sharing. Dominic. Sometimes I hear swear words on the Pandora app, while listening to music. I learned some rap songs contain negative stereotypes about women. I wonder why some hip-hop artists use misogynistic lyrics against women.