Category Korea

Last Week, This Week, Next Week in Korean and More

Last Week, This Week, Next Week in Korean and More

Just like in English and other languages, you should know how describe weeks by saying things like this week, last week, and so on. You will hear these frequently spoken in Korean so knowing these will help your vocabulary a lot. Graphic above and we’ve also written them below. If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

주 (ju) = Week

지난주 (ji-nan-ju) = Last week

지지난주 (ji-ji-nan-ju) = Week before last

이번주 (i-beon-ju) = This week

다음주 (da-eum-ju) = Next week

다다음주 (da-da-eum-ju) = Week after next week

주말 (ju-mal) = Weekend

평일 (pyeong-il) = Weekdays

매주 (mae-ju) = Every week

How to Count or Say Number of Days in Korean

How to Count or Say Number of Days in Korean

Knowing how to count days in Korean may seem difficult at first, but if you practice and study, you will be able to remember these words easily. You may have found yourself wanting to know how to count one day, two days, or three days in Korean and never knew how but w hope this graphic can help!

For “하루” you may be very familiar with this one as it is used a lot with “종일”.

하루종일 means all day long and you can hear this a lot in song lyrics. The others are probably more unfamiliar to you (even I didn’t know most of these).

Use our helpful graphic above and we have written them below. If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

하루 (ha-ru) = One day

이틀 (i-teul) = Two days

사흘 (sa-heul) = Three days

나흘 (na-heul) = Four days

닷새 (dat-sae) =  Five days

엿새 (yeot-sae) = Six days

이레 (i-re) = Seven days

여드레 (yeo-deu-re) = Eight days

아흐레 (a-heu-re) = Nine days

열흘 (yeol-heul) = Ten days

 

Making Words Cute or Casual in Korean

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These ways of making Korean words casual or cute is very common and used by lots of people. You may have seen some of your Korean friends using these and been confused…well now you know! Try using some of these yourself. And Happy Hangul Day! We have also written them below. If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

Adding “ㅇ” as the final consonant:

Why? = 왜? (wae) –> 왱? (waeng)

Yes = 네 (ne) –> 넹 (neng)

Pretty = 이쁘다 (i-ppeu-da) –> 이쁘당 (i-ppeu-dang)

Adding “ㅁ” or “음”

No = 아니야 (a-ni-ya) –> 아니얌 (a-ni-yam)

Older man (to women) = 오빠야 (o-ppa-yam) –> 오빠얌 (o-ppa-yam)

Good = 좋아요 (jo-a-yo) –> 좋아염 (jo-a-yeom)

 

 

 

Announcing Our Fall Sale!

After settling down from our recent trip, we can finally go ahead and announce our fall sale. Get any one of the posters below for up to 60% off. This sale will end at the end of October and we only have 50 copies of each. Links below:

Korean Food Map (FALL SALE! Ends October 31st)

Periodic Table of Korean Food (FALL SALE! Ends October 31st)

Bridges of Seoul Poster (FALL SALE! Ends October 31st)

Bridges of Seoul Poster (FALL SALE! Ends October 31st)

fall-sale

Reasons to Drink Soju…

reasons to drink soju

I’ve actually never been a fan of stuff, but drink it sometimes when out with older Koreans. The new fruit versions are very tasty though and very dangerous since they are sweet and easy to down. Also with #3…while soju is still relatively cheap, the price has been going up over the past couple of years.

Vocabulary: Hair Colors (Natural) in Korean

Hair color vocabulary in korean

Here are the natural hair colors in Korean. We may do another one on other colors, but it’s pretty simple. You just add whatever color the hair is and attach “머리” (usually). We have written the vocabulary below as well. Enjoy! If you want to study even more and improve your Korean, check out our ebooks over at the Dom & Hyo Store.

검은색 머리 (geom-eun-saek meo-ri) = Black hair

금발 (geum-bal) = Blonde hair

갈색 머리 (gal-saek meo-ri) = Brown hair

짙은갈색 머리 (jit-eun-gal-saek meo-ri) = Dark brown hair

빨간색 머리 (bbal-gan-saek meo-ri) = Red hair

흰 머리/백발 (hwin meo-ri/baek-bal) = Gray hair/White hair